Self-Care In the New Year: Reducing Stress and Embracing Support

The holiday season, while filled with joy and festivity, can also be a time of heightened stress for child and youth-serving professionals. Balancing the demands of work with the personal commitments of the season can be challenging, especially in environments committed to inclusive practices and positive behavior support. After all of the holiday hustle and…

Read More

How to Stop Cyber Bullying

The world teenagers live in is so different, in many ways, from the one we grew up in. The constant access to social media has caused an uptick in bullying– particularly cyber bullying. Kids are able to hide behind a keyboard or a screen, and in doing so, they are more likely to forget that…

Read More

Teaching All People to Change Their Aim

This week, Torrie, our CEO at KIT, sent along the following video to all of us at KIT. The video, produced by Torrie’s friend Shelley Moore, explains the purpose and value of inclusion in a way that enhances our understanding of why (and how) we include. My favorite part of this analogy is that, when…

Read More

That Kid That Needs a Little Bit More Love

We all have that one student that needs a little bit more love… The one that really pushes our buttons. The one who we think about on evenings and weekends who we just don’t know how to reach. Well, this student for me last year was a seventh grader named Amanda. Amanda frequently walked right…

Read More

The Legacy of ADA

Twenty-five years ago yesterday, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed by President George H.W. Bush. The ADA changed the everyday experiences for people with disabilities. June 26, 1990 was an incredible milestone for the disability community. The purpose of ADA is to prohibit discrimination based on disability and provide similar protections to those…

Read More

Why (and Where) Kids with Disabilities Should Do Chores

A couple of months ago, I read a few posts on Big Blueberry Eyes, Love That Max, and BLOOM about kids with disabilities being required to do chores at school. It all began when Michelle, author of Big Blueberry Eyes, went to observe the class her daughter will be joining next year as she transitions…

Read More

A Day to Remember

Some of you may remember my post a few weeks ago about hearing the r-word in school. I teach middle school special education, and it’s such a challenge to think about how little 12-year-olds know about what might offend people who are different from them. We can’t get mad because they honestly don’t know what…

Read More